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Why The Greens Groaned.

02/12/2010

The Don Quixote party of the 21st century charged at windmills and saved no one from anything or anyone.

If you are a Greens voter, then the Victorian election should have taught you something. Voting Greens is like taking a piss in a dark suit. You may have a warm feeling, and initially no one notices that you wet your pants but then they notice a stink.

Voting Green, it seems, is not a vote for Labor. There is no coalition of these two parties and the divide between the two is too great to form one until backs are against the wall. And even then its a relationship formed by inconvenience.

Lower House

More detailed Lower House summary >

Party First Preference Votes Counted % First Preference Votes Counted
AUSTRALIAN GREENS 289515 10.69%
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY 992149 36.63%
CHRISTIAN PARTY 561 0.02%
COUNTRY ALLIANCE 39481 1.46%
D.L.P. – DEMOCRATIC LABOR PARTY 23928 0.88%
FAMILY FIRST 59590 2.20%
LIBERAL 1025172 37.85%
SEX PARTY 12835 0.47%
SOCIALIST ALLIANCE 1541 0.06%
THE NATIONALS 192118 7.09%
Other candidates 71459 2.64%
Total Voters Enrolled as at the close of roll 3582232
Total Formal Votes Counted 2708349 95.09% of the total votes counted
Total Informal Votes Counted 139979 4.91% of the total votes counted
Total Votes Counted 2848328 79.51% of the total enrolment at the close of roll

SOURCE: http://www.tallyroom.vic.gov.au/

The ALP vote was 1.22% lower than the LIB vote. The Coalition took the lead with the Nationals bonus of 7.09% and 10 of the 45 seats required to form government. The Greens took in 10.69% of the vote though and if there was a coalition between the ALP and Greens, then this would of and should of seen the ALP returned. That’s if a vote for the Greens is a vote for the ALP. Not only did the Greens fail to win ONE lower house seat, the majority of those votes were in competition to the ALP.

There can be no alliance between these two parties because unlike the Nationals and the Liberal party, neither will give ground. The Nationals and the Liberals rarely compete against each other. I say rarely because there are exceptions. One notable recent federal election case of this was were Tony Crook kicked out Wilson Tuckey. But most of the time, the two parties sit down and dissect the electoral map. I can never see this happening between the ALP and Greens. What possible hope of the Greens been able to compete in the regions? And to the ALP, they can win city seats in their own right, so they will not give those up to the Greens.

The Victorian election was an outstanding victory for the Coalition. However, the victory may have opened a door for the ALP that was previously unseen in QLD and NSW. For many who voted Green did so hoping that a Green member would be elected. I doubt they wanted a Coalition member in the seat. In that regards, the Coalition’s argument that a vote for the Greens is a vote for the ALP is true. But likewise, on seeing the outstanding failure of the Greens to win even one seat, many who may have voted Greens in upcoming elections will not do so. They may not necessarily vote ALP, but I doubt they would vote for Reverend Nile’s Festival of Light party or the Liberal Party. This can make elections that may have been easy pickings for the Coalition a little more difficult. Mind you, the NSW election does not look like one they could possibly lose. It could however reduce their number in the house.

Conversely, the swing away from the ALP in NSW could result in a much bigger Green vote, but without the numbers required to challenge any party that form government, the vote may end up be a wasted one.

It shall be interesting times for the upcoming elections in QLD and NSW. Probably not so much in QLD as in NSW where the senate vote will be the huge challenge. The Coalition it seems may also have the numbers in the senate despite this.

Upper House

More detailed Upper House summary >

Party First Preference Votes Counted % First Preference Votes Counted
AUSTRALIAN GREENS 89773 14.90%
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY 242946 40.31%
CHRISTIAN PARTY 3203 0.53%
COUNTRY ALLIANCE 6141 1.02%
D.L.P. – DEMOCRATIC LABOR PARTY 15276 2.53%
FAMILY FIRST 14897 2.47%
LIBERAL 146420 24.30%
LIBERAL / THE NATIONALS 61890 10.27%
SEX PARTY 16329 2.71%
Other candidates 5787 0.96%
Total Voters Enrolled as at the close of roll 3582232
Total Formal Votes Counted 602662 95.51% of the total votes counted
Total Informal Votes Counted 28309 4.49% of the total votes counted
Total Votes Counted 630971 17.61% of the total enrolment at the close of roll

SOURCE: http://www.tallyroom.vic.gov.au/

Despite the fact that the ALP has defeated the combined vote of the Liberal Party and the National Party, the senate may end up controlled by the Coalition!

What I don’t understand is why both parties and the media always play the preference card when it comes to the Greens and they NEVER seem to highlight who the other parties are preferencing, and why. What may change the game back to the Greens is this.

“The Greens are an independent political force, and we are neither a faction of nor a preference machine for Labor or any other party.The Greens should not have directed preferences to the Labor Party. We should have gone open ticket, allowing Victorian voters to make up their own minds. We should also move to make open tickets the default position for all elections, including federal polls.”

SOURCE: http://www.theage.com.au/opinion/politics/blogs/gengreens/a-lesson-for-the-majors/20101129-18djy.html

Sarah Hanson-Young is probably spot on. An open ticket would stop a lot of the scrutiny that both parties and the media love to play against the Greens and any third political power. But directing preferences to the ALP did not help the ALP win office. Something many ALP voters will notice. And really…who bothers with voting below the line? The worry is if you make a mistake, you void your entire vote.

No matter how Sarah tries to paint a rosy picture on the Greens outcome in Victoria, at the end of the day, they failed to win a seat because they need preferences to do so in their own right. They will get these from any party that considers an election to be close. Any other possible outcomes and they will fail.

And there lies the key to victory for minor parties. Sow dissent. Balance the voters views. If there is a strong ALP vote likely, they need to work on changing that. If there is a strong Coalition vote likely, they need to diminish that. Of course doing so will in return earn the ire of both majors till they deliberately decide that it is better to make it a 2 horse race rather than a race where an outsider has a chance to win.

Whatever happens, the Greens have finally entered the Green Hill Zone. The trick is this.

You need to stop running around in circles like retards, avoid the spikes, not always head to the right and if you do make it, you need to chill out and take a piss.

A. Ghebranious 2010 All Rights Reserved

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3 Comments
  1. Andrew Jackson permalink

    What true accuracy
    ” Voting Greens is like taking a piss in a dark suit. You may have a warm feeling, and initially no one notices that you wet your pants but then they notice a stink”
    They certainly stink of immorality, degeneracy amd avarice.
    Most of them are parsitic inner city yuppies hell bent on making others lose their jobs whilst they retain well paid service positions which contribute not one iota of wealth to the community. The fact that the ALP contemplates placing working class votes into the posckets of the parasitic class is disgusting. The best thing we could do with the Greens is compost them.
    .

    • I think you bypass the several occasions that the coalition also made deals with the greens. Love is a two party preferred street.

      • Andrew Jackson permalink

        THe libs are no better than ALP. I agree they both would sacrifice principle for power. It is however the GReens that are morally degenerate.

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